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Old 02-28-2008, 02:33 PM   #81
Kroms
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHOP-E
fight club is probably my favorite book of all time with anything by william s. burroughs a close second
I've yet to read him. Which to start with?

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Haven't read Doyle, but I want to
Just go get The Complete Sherlock Holmes, they're fantastic.
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Old 02-28-2008, 02:47 PM   #82
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Doyle's The Lost World was pretty cool too.


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Old 03-01-2008, 05:26 PM   #83
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Ive been reading Stephen King mostly now. I am rereading The Running Man and I must say it is getting better everytime I read it


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Old 03-01-2008, 05:39 PM   #84
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"Options" by Fake Steve Jobs is actually pretty good...

"Gates: How Microsoft's Mogul Reinvented an Industry-and Made Himself the Richest Man in America"
Is an excellent in-depth view on the rise of Bill Gates. Both good books that any tech-lover should enjoy.



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Old 03-03-2008, 11:33 AM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kroms
I've yet to read him. Which to start with?



Just go get The Complete Sherlock Holmes, they're fantastic.
You should probably start with Junky, because it gives a lot of his background and that'll make the rest of his work make more sense.
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Old 03-05-2008, 02:40 AM   #86
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I am reading Robinson Cruiseo by Daniel Defoe and it is getting pretty interesting. Many of the books from the 1600s were good classics that revolutionized fiction.


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Old 03-05-2008, 03:54 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHOP-E
You should probably start with Junky, because it gives a lot of his background and that'll make the rest of his work make more sense.
Will do.

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Originally Posted by RakataDark
I am reading Robinson Cruiseo by Daniel Defoe and it is getting pretty interesting.
I wonder if you'll spot the hilarious continuity error.
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:47 AM   #88
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I just finished re-reading "choke" by chuck palahniuk and i forgot how awesome that book is.
It's about a med. school drop out who pretends to choke on food in hopes that the people who save him will feel responcible for his life and send him money. No matter how improbable it may seem it actually works. Anyways he uses this and other small cons to suport his lunatic mother. All n' all pretty friggin' awesome book.
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Old 03-13-2008, 02:54 PM   #89
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I read Fight Club and loved it, but I'm worried that all of his books will follow that same formula. I hate it when someone resorts to repeating themselves. It gets boring, unless it's clever, like how The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings share characters, have the same world, have the same idea for a story, and yet are completely, utterly, and brilliantly different.
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Old 03-13-2008, 05:37 PM   #90
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Kroms, nice to meet you - always good when a new person joins the staff!

I know what you mean about Palahniuk. I read 'Fight Club' and 'Survivor' and thought they were great, but he seems to be playing that transgressive banjo a bit too much. But I guess I should read his other books before moaning about his single trick.


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Old 03-13-2008, 06:30 PM   #91
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Try his latest, "Rant," it's pretty ****ing great.


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Old 03-16-2008, 03:46 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by elTee
Kroms, nice to meet you - always good when a new person joins the staff!
Hi! The pleasure is all mine!

Quote:
Originally Posted by elTee
I know what you mean about Palahniuk. I read 'Fight Club' and 'Survivor' and thought they were great, but he seems to be playing that transgressive banjo a bit too much. But I guess I should read his other books before moaning about his single trick.
Yeah, it's what bothered me the most, the same cow being milked, if you will. Which is odd, because the smartest person I know is a huge fan of all his works. I'm talking someone who'd have Einstein scribbling notes. I don't get it: doesn't it become boring after a while?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RemiO
Try his latest, "Rant," it's pretty ****ing great
Soon. Right now I'm in the middle of this 700-pager I won't name because of how bad it is. Actually, wait, I will: No-one ever read The Lives of John Lennon: so, so bad.
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Old 03-25-2008, 11:46 AM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elTee
I know what you mean about Palahniuk. I read 'Fight Club' and 'Survivor' and thought they were great, but he seems to be playing that transgressive banjo a bit too much. But I guess I should read his other books before moaning about his single trick.
I've read alot of his stuff and it is all that same jumpy, overly graphic style that Fight Club is in. However, it's still entertaing for me to read no matter how repetative. but if his next book comes out with a character named Dyler Turdon, and I don't think it's far off, I'm giving up.
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:28 PM   #94
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Just started reading "Bussiness @ the speed of light" by Bill Gates. It's actually pretty in-depth, and I enjoy it. Not everyone's cup of tea, but for any Bill Gates fan.



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Old 04-14-2008, 11:58 AM   #95
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I got assigned to read that book "The Kite Runner" for my english class, and to my surprise it's not bad. Which is a first, considering my school is well, we'll call it 'behinde the times'.
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Old 05-20-2008, 11:35 PM   #96
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Finished
Cryptonomicon - Neal Stephenson
Reacquired immediately after I graduated from Basic training and hastily finished. I crammed through the last 300 pages in about a week and missed out on a lot of badly needed sleep, but it was worth it.

Newton's Cannon: Book one of the age of Unreason - Gregory Keyes
Mailed down to me a week and a half ago, I finished it over 2 days, during which I should have been studying (Still did excellently on that block test but nearly died of stress the night before.
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Old 05-22-2008, 03:58 PM   #97
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On Thuesday I bought Star Wars Republic Commando 3 and a new book about the 4th Indy movie.
And two dictionaries: spanish and japanese

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Old 08-27-2008, 02:38 PM   #98
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Books I read this summer:

- Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind, translated by

Every year I read one book that manages to make me lower my expectations and then sucker-punch me a few on the nose. This was that book. Seductive, passionate, delicious, glorious, magnificent, a triumph, and it will cause you to lean against the wall and smell and try to catch your breath as it drowns you. Truly, truly wonderful. 10/10. (PS: it might offend the religious, but I'm in that group and I was OK.)

- The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie.

I promised myself I'd read all of Agatha Christie's work by the time I was thirty. This is her first, and is pretty good, with the exception of one silly red herring. I read it in a day. Nothing like a good mystery novel. Oh, yeah, bet you a dollar you won't guess the murderer. 8/10.

- The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

Fun, if a little silly. The only part that really works is the actual rape and murder at the book's beginning, and a little bit of that murder's consequences. The rest is just a slightly more literate version of a trashy romance novel. It's easy to see why it got so much acclaim - that our beloved dead are in a (controversially) better place. Didn't really click for me, though, even if that IS what I believe in. 6/10.

- The Giver by Lois Lowry

Thanks to my sister for giving me this. What can I say? Lowry uses a book's limitations (no sight, no sound) to her advantage and does it well. The story itself concerns a boy who gets ready to be assigned his "role" in a dystopia unlike someone like Philip Dick would write. I liked it, even if it is for children. It lacks depth, but for some reason that's OK. 8/10.

- The Holcroft Covenant by Robert Ludlum

Typical Ludlum: great plot, good story but 2D characters (or, more specifically, characters-that-never-change-or-fall-in-love-in-3-days). The action is amazing though, and it's definitely an interesting, but also entertaining, read. 8/10.
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Old 08-27-2008, 04:50 PM   #99
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I recently read Term Limits by Vince Flynn. It's a really intriguing novel. The one I'm reading is Called Nuclear Family Vacation which is a history of nuclear facilities around the world, which is pretty interesting.

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Old 08-27-2008, 05:24 PM   #100
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Good, now go read "And Then There Were None" and try to guess the solution.

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Old 08-28-2008, 08:31 AM   #101
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I've been reading Discworld again lately. Recently finished Witches Abroad and Small Gods (which is unlike most of the others, but in my opinion very well done), and now I'm at Lords and Ladies, but I probably won't finish that in a while, since college is starting again. Also, I'm reading James Joyce's Ulysses, slowly but surely.

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Old 08-28-2008, 08:45 AM   #102
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I've just finished the 'His Dark Materials' trilogy by Philip Pullman. Incredible stories. Impossible to tell what will happen after Northern Lights (Uhh, Golden Compass for you North Americans). The Subtle Knife just flies off on this tangent, and all is wrapped up with Amber Spyglass.

I still can't believe there was a Christian backlash in the US so strong as to probably kill any chance of movie sequels to Golden Compass. Ironic considering it'd dogma and 'blindly following organised religion' that is the central theme.

Thank goodness I cane to this series late, and didn't have those agonising waits between books!

I don't have time to read very often, so this last month with my nose in those pages was a really nice diversion.
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Old 08-28-2008, 10:55 AM   #103
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I dug out some ancient Jules Verne books from the bookshelves at my grandma's place (I used to read them when I was there during holidays) when I visited her a month ago. And by ancient I mean they're dusty, yellowed, and printed in old German letters.


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Old 08-28-2008, 12:22 PM   #104
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I still can't believe there was a Christian backlash in the US so strong as to probably kill any chance of movie sequels to Golden Compass. Ironic considering it'd dogma and 'blindly following organised religion' that is the central theme.
I haven't read the book (although they're highly recommended) but in all fairness, the reason their probably won't be a sequel to the movie is because it did badly at the box office and...really, it wasn't that good a movie. From what I've heard, the movie didn't end in the same place where the book did which hurt things a bit as the director seemed to be focussing too much on giving us a cliff hanger ending like the first Lord of the Rings did without actually earning it. Most of the rest of the move was rather weak as well, which is a shame considering its ensemble cast.

Oh, and the movie played down the "religion is nothing more than a controlling establishment" theme considerably so that people wouldn't be offended and I have a feeling that hurt the movie as well since it was one of the main themes of the book.

Really, the movie just wasn't a decent adaption and was a poor movie overall. From what I've heard, there are talks of sequels, but I think the only reason they'd do it is so New Line didn't have a movie with a story that didn't actually finish.

Oh, and funny thing, Pullmans original Americanised title for Northern Lights was "The Golden Compasses", the plural suggesting he was talking about a pair of compasses, used to chart a course over a map or draw a circle. It somehow evolved with the US publisher to "The Golden Compass", suggesting it refered to the very uncompass like device the girl had.

Oh, and just to keep things on topic, I just read Artemis Fowl: The Time Paradox. Enjoyable read, if a bit short, it was enjoyable, especially in the fact that it's one of very few stories about time travel that didn't actually end up with a paradox (despite the title of the book).

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Old 08-28-2008, 03:48 PM   #105
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Yeah I want to read the new Artemis Fowl as well -- and don't forgot I was the one who got you into that series, Joshi!

You're a bit wrong about the Golden Compass movie: whilst the reason that the sequels probably won't get made is because it did badly in the box office, the reason it did badly at the box office was because of Christian nuts. Probably, anyway. It did extremely well outside of America. And I don't think it's a bad film at all. I think it's a good film. Not as good as it could have been, but good all the same.

The director was actually forced to cut the ending off by the studio -- the proper ending was filmed, but a decision was made at the last minutes by suits.

I'm not sure one of the main themes of the books is "religion is nothing more than a controlling establishment": that's just too simple. Rather, it's "controlling establishments should always be rebelled against; religion is one example of an establishment that can be overly controlling." Pullman doesn't think that the church is the source of all evil. But parts of it have been in the past.
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Old 08-28-2008, 04:15 PM   #106
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Yes I remember you got me into that. And just to rub it in your face, my local Waterstones had a bunch of the new books signed by the author, one of which i managed to get my hands on (not like they were disappearing fast, Colfer's one hell of an underrated childrens author).

And as for the Golden Compass, I guess it just comes down to preference. I remember looking forward to the film and then feeling a little let down when I saw it. The little girl's acting was fairly wooden, somewhat like Daniel Radcliffe in the first couple of Harry Potter movies and the battle at the end seemed a little forced (I'm sure it was in the book, but I feel the book would have led up to it rather better). And overall, even the polar bear fight wasn't enough to save the film (I like it, but I just felt the rest of the film pailed in comparison). That said, I do want to read the books, not because I believe that every book is automatically 10 times better than it's film counterpart, but because a number of the ideas in the movie interest me.

I know there was a fair amount of controversy over the movie from Christian Fundamentalists, but I didn't know how far reaching it was. Still, at 54% on Rotten Tomatoes, the word of mouth on the film wasn't good either.

Still despite whose fault it was, the ending was rather abrupt and bad, which left a sour taste in my mouth (and made me wonder what happened to the couple of scenes I never got to see which were in the trailer, according to Weitz, it'll be put on the front of the sequel instead, should it be made) .

And as for the theme of the book, well I haven't read it so I guess I'm a little confused by it's themes. And just to clarify, what I said up there was what I thought the theme was, not what I believe (if we wanted to go into it, I wouldn't agree that religion is an institution we should break down because it's the root of all evil, I believe it's a tool used by the corrupt to do heinous things and should we get rid of religion they'd just find another tool).

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Old 08-28-2008, 04:29 PM   #107
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I definitely agree with what you said about religion... I recently read (to go back to topic) Arthur C. Clarke's "Songs of Distant Earth" (also an album, thanks Remi!) I loved it, but there was an anti-religious strand that bothered me. Religion was portrayed as the bane of humanity, and life without it was practically a Utopia. Bollocks to that!

I'm now reading P.H. Newby's "One of the Founders," and loving it.
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Old 08-28-2008, 04:30 PM   #108
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Early in the summer I bought "The Making of Star Wars" and it has all the "lost interviews" plus lots of cool artwork and such, its very interesting, covers the entire production.

I also just picked up Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, wanted to reread it before the new movie came out, and even though the movie was delayed I was still in the mood to read it.


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Old 08-28-2008, 06:17 PM   #109
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It was the movie that made me pick up the His Dark Materials books. As gabez says, it did very well outside the USA. I thought the movie was great, didn't think Lyra's actress was wooden at all. And there's no way the cutoff point (which gave the movie a happy ending) was anywhere near the cliffhanger that the book ends on.

Also, the real anti-establishment stuff comes in books 2 and 3, it's really not that big of a deal in Northern Lights.
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:03 PM   #110
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I definitely agree with what you said about religion... I recently read (to go back to topic) Arthur C. Clarke's "Songs of Distant Earth" (also an album, thanks Remi!) I loved it, but there was an anti-religious strand that bothered me. Religion was portrayed as the bane of humanity, and life without it was practically a Utopia. Bollocks to that!
People seem to attribute all the atrocities of the past solely on religion which is rather myopic. Attrocities were committed because corrupt people craved power and they used religion in order to get it. Had they not had religion, they'd have found something else to use as a scapegoat for their madness. If religion were not around, we'd still have the crazy and the corrupt.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jp-30
It was the movie that made me pick up the His Dark Materials books. As gabez says, it did very well outside the USA. I thought the movie was great, didn't think Lyra's actress was wooden at all. And there's no way the cutoff point (which gave the movie a happy ending) was anywhere near the cliffhanger that the book ends on.
It was the first two Harry Potter movies that made me pick up those books, but by no means were they good movies. And yes, Golden Compass did well outside of the US, but they were still critically slated and the public view wasn't much better. I never attribute the quality of a film by how well it does at the box office, if anything I attribute the films marketting to that.

And it's not that fact that the movie had a cliff hanger, but simply that it didn't earn it. But again, these are just opinions.

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Old 09-18-2008, 07:46 AM   #111
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My dissertation tutor told me to read Don Delillo's Libra, about the Kennedy Assasination, and it immediately jumped into the category of 'favourite books of all time'. Now I'm reading Underworld by the same author, and it's even better. The man is a genius, it's really kind of dispiriting.


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Old 10-27-2008, 02:35 PM   #112
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Good, now go read "And Then There Were None" and try to guess the solution.
I read this yesterday. Pretty scary but also not very believable. Lots of fun though.

HOW the killer did it was obvious, even to the last twist. I just thought the killer was someone else. I thought it was...are there any spoiler tags?
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Old 10-27-2008, 05:30 PM   #113
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Yes, there be
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spoiler tags!
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Old 10-27-2008, 08:40 PM   #114
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Yes, there be
spoiler:
spoiler tags!
OK, so I
spoiler:
totally guessed the fake death, and I knew that it was one of the people under the sheets. My guess was either Justice Wargrave, or Mrs. Rogers. I went for Mrs. Rogers, even though some evidence pointed-to the contrary, and for a while I really thought I had him with Philip Lombard. But it was Justice Wargrave. I knew that the killer would fake his death a few pages in (thanks to the back of the book: "Only the dead are above suspicion") and I knew I was right by the time Blore died, but I wasn't expecting Justice Wargrave to be the killer.


So, almost had it. I had the HOW, not the WHO.
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Old 10-28-2008, 10:20 AM   #115
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Hmmmmm!
spoiler:
My book never said anything like that on the back! I checked out the movie versions and it looks like only the Russian one from the 1980s kept the original ending. Sucks...
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Old 10-28-2008, 02:53 PM   #116
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Hmmmmm!
spoiler:
My book never said anything like that on the back! I checked out the movie versions and it looks like only the Russian one from the 1980s kept the original ending. Sucks...
Dama Agatha adapted the book into a play, in which she changed the ending to
spoiler:
Wargrave revealing himself before Evra Claythorne commits suicide; at that point, Lombard, having survived Evra's shot ("Woman can't aim straight enough" apparently), kills Wargrave; I think they both then hang themselves, or get married. I can't remember. There's a lot more dialogue in the play


So maybe the films used her ending. Although some films just changed the setting and kept the story intact.
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Old 10-28-2008, 05:22 PM   #117
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spoiler:
In the 1945 movie, Wargrave does reveal himself and Eva only pretended to shoot Lombard. Wargrave commits suicide before finding out, expecting Eva to either hang herself or get hanged when they find her alone with 9 corpses. There's then a happy ending.
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Old 10-31-2008, 02:45 PM   #118
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Star Wars Republic Commando Triple Zero.
Ive the 3rd part of the SW Republic Commando books and the new book of the 4th Indy movie.

And since today: The most sold book in Germany... Well find it out by yourself...
Amazon is qiuck.
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Old 10-31-2008, 06:50 PM   #119
Ascovel
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I was reading The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brian, but I accidently read what is reavealed at the very end and I'm not very keen on finishing it anymore.

Last edited by Ascovel; 10-31-2008 at 08:32 PM. Reason: I mixed up one O'Brian with another
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Old 10-31-2008, 10:12 PM   #120
urluckyday
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Try Star Wars Allegiance if you're looking for a good Star Wars novel w/ lots of stormtroopers...a great read in any case for a Star Wars fan (now in paperback finally!).



If I die today, I'm happy how my life turned out
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